Category Archives: Reviews

It Comes at Night

Restrained, rigorous, and unrelentingly bleak, It Comes at Night is a daunting drama with a grueling mood; a lithe exploration of family amidst intense scrutiny and paranoia; and a patient, pulse-pounding thriller that’s – refreshingly, terrifyingly – not about the things that go bump in the night. Lean and mean, it comes packaged to rouse people from their slumber and keep them up shaking in their beds.

Continue reading

Tagged , , , , , ,

Martyrs

Resolutely bleak, extraordinarily harrowing, and relentlessly upsetting, Martyrs is a shocking, disturbing French arthouse horror that earns its reputation, a memorable journey of vile deeds that one does not wish to remember but cannot forget. It’s a grisly thought provoker that’s nearly overwhelming in its capacity to provoke not only thoughts, but disgust, chills, nausea, and everything in between.

Continue reading

Tagged , , , , ,

Let the Right One In

Unbearably moving, crisply intelligent, and gorgeously lensed, Let the Right One In is a superb accomplishment on every level: a remarkable coming-of-age story, a disturbing horror film, and a devastating romance. Ice-cold and incredibly captivating, it’s one of the best films of the year.

Continue reading

Tagged , , , , ,

Get Out

Deftly implemented, unsettlingly relevant, and blisteringly funny, Get Out is an impressive horror debut that’s perfect for Sundance, an agile social commentary, and a terrific calling card for its young director. Spinning with twists and turns and uneasy tension (the first scene will trigger severe heart palpitations), it’s savvy, smart entertainment that’s mostly bold.

Continue reading

Tagged , , , , , , ,

American Honey

Perpetually engaging and enthusiastically irresponsible, American Honey is a fascinating coming-of-age story with naturalistic performances; and a free-spirited road movie with languishing, exultant moments. Gleefully unhinged and indulgent, it’s a wild ride through sex, drugs, and hip hop, with the journey led by one of Britain’s preeminent auteurs working out of her supposed comfort zone.

Continue reading

Tagged , , , , ,

Little Men

Gentle, poignant, and engrossing, Little Men is a tiny drama of big themes and well-drawn characters; a detailed, delicate portrait of two families in conflict; and a compelling generational jump for its filmmaker from retirement into childhood. Humane in its truthfulness and beautiful in its humanity, it’s a canvas on which the most relatable of all experiences plays out: life.

Continue reading

Tagged , , , , , , , ,

Kubo and the Two Strings

Artistically dazzling, visually ambitious, and deceptively layered, Kubo and the Two Strings is an imaginative, origami-inspired animated adventure; a dreamlike, mythical tale steeped in history and the horrors of growing up; and a captivating exploration of destiny, death, family, and following your own path. Original and evocative, it’s a lovingly sculpted, fully realized work destined to be enjoyed and cherished by audiences of all ages.

Continue reading

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,