100 Best Screenplays

  • Casablanca (Epstein & Koch, 1942)
  • The Godfather (Puzo & Coppola, 1972)
  • Chinatown (Towne, 1974)
  • Citizen Kane (Mankiewicz & Welles, 1941)
  • All About Eve (Mankiewicz, 1950)
  • Annie Hall (Allen & Brickman, 1977)
  • Sunset Blvd. (Brackett & Wilder, 1950)
  • Some Like It Hot (Wilder & Diamond, 1959)
  • The Godfather Part II (Coppola & Puzo, 1974)
  • Network (Chayevsky, 1976)

  • Dr. Strangelove (Kubrick & George, 1960)
  • Pulp Fiction (Tarantino & Avary, 1994)
  • Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (Goldman, 1969)
  • The Graduate (Willingham & Henry, 1967)
  • The Apartment (Wilder & Diamond, 1960)
  • Tootsie (Gelbart & Schisgal, 1982)
  • On the Waterfront (Schulberg, 1954)
  • To Kill A Mockingbird (Foote, 1962)
  • Lawrence of Arabia (Bolt & Wilson, 1962)
  • It’s a Wonderful Life (Goodrich & Hackett, 1946)
  • North by Northwest (Lehman, 1959)
  • Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (Kaufman, 2004)
  • Gone With the Wind (Howard, 1939)
  • The Shawshank Redemption (Darabont, 1994)
  • The Wizard of Oz (Langley & Ryerson, 1939)
  • Double Indemnity (Wilder & Chandler, 1944)
  • Groundhog Day (Rubin & Ramis, 1993)
  • American Beauty (Ball, 1999)
  • Sullivan’s Travels (Sturges, 1941)
  • Fargo (Coen, 1996)
  • The Third Man (Greene, 1949)
  • The Sweet Smell of Success (Odets & Lehman, 1957)
  • The Usual Suspects (McQuarrie, 1995)
  • Midnight Cowboy (Salt, 1969)
  • All the President’s Men (Goldman, 1976)
  • Manhattan (Allen & Brickman, 1979)
  • LA Confidential (Hedgeland & Hanson, 1997)
  • The Philadelphia Story (Stewart, 1940)
  • Being John Malkovich (Kaufman, 1999)
  • When Harry Met Sally (Ephron, 1989)
  • GoodFellas (Pileggi & Scorsese, 1990)
  • Raiders of the Lost Ark (Kasdan, 1981)
  • Taxi Driver (Schrader, 1976)
  • One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (Hauben & Goldman, 1975)
  • The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (Huston, 1948)
  • The Silence of the Lambs (Tally, 1991)
  • The Maltese Falcon (Huston, 1941)
  • The Bridge on the River Kwai (Foreman & Wilson, 1957)
  • Schindler’s List (Zaillian, 1993)
  • Apocalypse Now (Milius & Coppola, 1979)
  • Broadcast News (Brooks, 1987)
  • His Girl Friday (Lederer, 1940)
  • The Best Years of Our Lives (Sherwood, 1944)
  • Shakespeare in Love (Norman & Stoppard, 1998)
  • The Lady Eve (Sturges, 1941)
  • Back to the Future (Zemeckis & Gale, 1985)
  • Crimes and Misdemeanors (Allen, 1989)
  • Ordinary People (Sargent, 1980)
  • It Happened One Night (Riskin, 1934)
  • Unforgiven (Peoples, 1992)
  • Moonstruck (Shanley, 1987)
  • Jaws (Benchley & Gottlieb, 1975)
  • Terms of Endearment (Brooks, 1983)
  • Singin’ in the Rain (Comden & Green, 1952)
  • The Sixth Sense (Shyamalan, 1999)
  • Jerry Maguire (Crowe, 1996)
  • ET: The Extra-Terrestrial (Mathison, 1982)
  • Star Wars (Lucas, 1977)
  • Dog Day Afternoon (Pierson, 1975)
  • The African Queen (Agee & Huston, 1951)
  • The Lion in Winter (Goldman, 1968)
  • Thelma & Louise (Khouri, 1991)
  • Amadeus (Schaffer, 1984)
  • High Noon (Foreman, 1952)
  • Raging Bull (Schrader & Martin, 1976)
  • Adaptation (Kaufman, 2002)
  • The Sting (Ward, 1939)
  • Rocky (Stallone, 1976)
  • The Producers (Brooks, 1968)
  • Witness (Wallace & Kelley, 1985)
  • Being There (Kosinski, 1979)
  • Cool Hand Luke (Pearce & Pierson, 1967)
  • Rear Window (Hayes, 1954)
  • The Princess Bride (Goldman, 1987)
  • La Grande Illusion (Renoir & Spaak, 1937)
  • Harold & Maude (Higgins, 1971)
  • 8 1/2 (Fellini & Pinelli, 1963)
  • Field of Dreams (Robinson, 1988)
  • Forrest Gump (Roth, 1994)
  • Sideways (Payne & Taylor, 2004)
  • The Verdict (Mamet, 1982)
  • Psycho (Stefano, 1960)
  • Do the Right Thing (Lee, 1989)
  • Patton (Coppola & North, 1970)
  • Hannah and Her Sisters (Allen, 1986)
  • The Hustler (Carroll & Rossen, 1961)
  • The Searchers (Nugent, 1956)
  • The Grapes of Wrath (Johnson, 1940)
  • The Wild Bunch (Green & Peckinpah, 1969)
  • Memento (Nolan, 1999)
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2 thoughts on “100 Best Screenplays

  1. Soze says:

    The original “The Matrix” script reads more like a pulp novel than a script and is a truly stellar work even if you’re less than a fan of the movie.

  2. Agreed. I’m actually a fan of the first movie, provided I forget about the sequels. Perhaps the script should bump one of the choices above.

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